Molecular Devices

High-Content & Phenotypic Screening User Meeting

Co-located with High-Content and Phenotypic Screening 2017

This user meeting will be held after day 1 of the High Content and Phenotypic Screening 2017 Meeting (25 April 2017).

A BUFFET DINNER WILL BE PROVIDED

Join high-content imaging experts as they discuss their experiences with high-content screening and 3D imaging, sharing findings and best practice.

Please register below to attend this free-of-charge event.

When:
Tuesday, 25 April 2017, 18:00-19:30

Where:
Kings Room

Holiday Inn, Cambridge (Part of the High-Content and Phenotypic Screening Meeting)
Lakeview
Bridge Road
Impington

Cambridge
CB24 9PH

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AGENDA
18:00   Opening words
18:05   Development and characterisation of a novel isogeneic, spontaneous breast cancer metastasis model (Abstract)
Ute Jungwirth, Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK
18:35   Recent and novel ImageXpress 3D confocal and widefield applications (Abstract)
Sarah Rowe, Application Scientist, Molecular Devices
18:55  3D culture in phenotypic screening: advantages, process changes and new technologies needed (Abstract)
Nathalie Maubon and Grégory Maubon,  HCS Pharma, Rennes, France

19:20  Closing words
19:30  Open discussion with buffet supper

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Presentation Abstracts

Ute Jungwirth (Postdoctoral Research Fellow)
Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK

Development and characterisation of a novel isogeneic, spontaneous breast cancer metastasis model  

The development of novel therapeutic strategies for targeting metastatic disease is still limited by our lack of knowledge of the later stages of the metastatic process. However, it is clear that successful metastatic colonisation involves a close crosstalk between tumour cells and the metastatic microenvironment. Unfortunately, in vitro models fail to recapitulate the different steps of the metastatic cascade and there are only a limited number of in vivo spontaneous metastasis models. Furthermore, human xenografts lack the interaction with the immune system, as they have to be transplanted into immunocompromised mice.

I will present the development of two isogenic, spontaneous BALB/c breast cancer metastasis models, namely D2A1-m1 and D2A1-m2, derived from the poorly metastasising D2A1 cell line, by serial in vivo passaging. We characterised the cell lines by high content 2D and 3D imaging (ImageXpress). In addition, gene expression profiling of the parental D2A1 cells and the metastasising D2A1-m1 and -m2 sub-lines identified a set of 24 differentially expressed genes correlating with reduced distant metastasis free survival.

In conclusion, the spontaneously metastasising D2A1-m1 and -m2 cell lines provide important independent syngeneic models for investigating the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning metastatic breast cancer progression.


Sarah Rowe (Field Application Scientist)
Molecular Devices, Wokingham, UK

Recent and novel ImageXpress 3D confocal and widefield applications

This presentation will provide insights into acquiring and analyzing data for a variety of high-throughput 3D and live-cell imaging applications, for samples from subcellular structures to spheroids. Applications such as 3D-spheroid imaging, slide scanning, protein co-localization assays, fast kinetic processes like beating cardiomyocytes, and zebrafish imaging will be outlined.


Nathalie Maubon (CEO, CSO) and Grégory Maubon (Digital Coordinator, CDO)
HCS Pharma, Rennes, France

3D culture in phenotypic screening: advantages, process changes and new technologies needed

Cellular assays in 3D culture have shown many advantages to better mimic the in vivo situation. A few examples in oncology, CNS and metabolic diseases, will be presented during this talk. High-Content Screening (HCS) devices, such as the ImageXpress Micro Confocal from Molecular Devices, are now fast enough and sensitive enough to allow image acquisition in 3D cellular models. Nevertheless, to go further, perceptions and processes need to be changed. We will discuss cutting-edge new technologies, including virtual and augmented realities, deep learning and machine learning, and explain how these new technologies can be of benefit to phenotypic screening.